Gourmet Raw Milk Cheese

Browse our great selection of International Gourmet Raw Milk Cheese. A cheese is considered a raw milk cheese when the milk used to produce that cheese, prior to setting the curd, has not been heated above 104°F. According to FDA regulations raw milk cheeses must be aged for 60 days or longer at a temperature of not less than 35°F. Is raw-milk cheese safe, does it taste better – a debate that is not going away any time soon if ever. Some believe that raw milk cheese does taste better; that the complexity of the organisms naturally occurring in raw milk deepens the flavor; that pasteurized cheeses can't really approach that. Others believe that the risk of contamination is too great and that many pasteurized cheeses are excellent and often award-winning while competing head-to-head with their raw milk brothers. The debate rages among cheese gourmands; try some raw milk cheeses and let us know what you think by giving us your opinion in a product review.

We will be adding exciting new Gourmet Raw Milk Cheeses frequently, so come back soon!

Our Featured Gourmet Raw Milk Cheese
Picture of idiazabal
Idiazabal is originally produced high in the Pyrenees above Pamplona. This rustic Spanish gourmet sheep's milk cheese was often smoked in the rafters of the shepherds' huts. Today, it is made all over the Basque country in both factory and farmstead, from unpasteurized milk. Idiazabal is produced in small drum shapes in varying sizes. The rind of this gourmet cheese is pale yellow in color and quite hard. The paste is creamy white and fairly compact with a few small holes. Smoked cheeses achieve a wonderful golden-brown color and dark ivory paste during its 5 months maturation. This smoked gourmet cheese has a delicately smoky, fudge-like aroma and flavor but with the farmyard like tang coming through quite strongly and remaining in the mouth for some time. read more...
What other Gourmets are buying
  • Tete de Moine means 'monk's head'. This Swiss gourmet cheese was originally invented by the monks of Belleray Abbey in the Bernese Jura, and they taught the local farmers how to make it. Unlike most other mountain gourmet cheeses which tend to be very large, it is made in small drums. The rind may be smooth and slightly greasy, or rough and brown in color. The paste is firm and creamy to straw-yel... read more
  • Parmigiano-Reggiano is a member of the Grana family of very hard Italian cheeses and it has been produced in small-size dairy farms for many hundreds of years. In the English-speaking world this famous cheese is generally known as Parmesan. Parmesan cheese is made in squat drums which look rather like small beer barrels. The rind is a shiny golden brown color and has the name of the cheese printe... read more
  • In 1872 Gabriel Coulet had the intention to start a wine cellar under his house when he found that the caves had natural ventilation which was great for aging cheese ... 'the rest is more history'. The Gabriel Coulet Roquefort is a multiple award winner and a great Roquefort. This white semi-soft cheese is elegantly garnished with green patches and it is a weeping cheese, producing a lot of moistu... read more
  • Raclette may be the world's most famous melting cheese, and it is made in the Savoie region of the Alps, in Switzerland and in France. Our French version is made of raw cow's milk and matured for at least 5 months in respect of the French cheese tradition. It is during this long ripening period that the flavor and excellent melting qualities develop. Raclette has a semi-soft interior dotted with s... read more
  • Already in 1941 the Maytag Dairy Farms began producing world famous Blue Cheese in Iowa. Now several generations later the Maytag family is still producing the same high quality blue cheese as in the earlier 1900s. Maytag Blue is made with unpasteurized milk from Holstein cattle; the hand-made cheese is made in small batches and is aged for months in the Maytag curing caves. Maytag Blue Cheese i... read more
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